Frankenstein: Unbound and Down

Having seen many film versions of the the classic Frankenstein story over the years, I can safely say that Roger Corman’s 1990 interpretation, Frankenstein Unbound, is the most…ummm…unique. A science fiction film as much as horror, the story begins in the far distant year of 2031, where a scientist named Buchanan (played by John Hurt)... Continue Reading →

If Thy Eye Offends Thee

In a long and varied career, there may not be a film style that Roger Corman has left untouched.  His is a legacy that defies classification but, if you were to try, Corman is probably most closely associated with his Gothic horrors and low-budget B-movie fare from the 50s and 60s.  The Gothic horrors were... Continue Reading →

Who’s Your Zombie Daddy?

There is an old Hollywood adage attributed to W. C. Fields (although probably not originating from him) that states, “Never work with children or animals.”  When at their best, children and animals command the spotlight and steal scenes from the rest of the cast.  When at their worst, they are unpredictable creatures that don’t behave... Continue Reading →

Amityville Horrible

Film franchises are a staple of the horror genre. Halloween, Friday the 13th and Nightmare on Elm Street are just a few modern examples, producing a myriad of sequels attempting to emulate the success of the original film. But if you measure the success of a franchise based on quantity over quality (please don’t do... Continue Reading →

Antlers: Taking Horror by the Horns

At first glance, Antlers (2021) may appear to be just another standard monster movie but scratch below the surface and you'll find a dark complexity that is rare in modern horror.  Set in a small, impoverished town in Oregon (but filmed in British Columbia, Canada), the film begins with a man and his young son being... Continue Reading →

Black Leather, Black Leather, Kill, Kill, Kill

In 1960, MGM British Studios first introduced us to a pack of blond-haired, candescent-eyed children in Village of the Damned (starring Barbara Shelley, a Hammer regular).  Four years later, the frightening and murderous youth would return in Children of the Damned.  In the interim, Hammer Film Productions would produce and release its own film about... Continue Reading →

Wake Wood: Three Days in Dismay

Released in 2009, Wake Wood was one of the first films produced by Hammer Films after it was relaunched following a decades long hiatus in 2007. Like the other recent Hammer projects, such as The Resident and The Lodge (which I reviewed last year), it varies considerably in style and subject from the early Hammer... Continue Reading →

The Men Who Should Have Cheated Death

From 1935 until 1979, Hammer Film Productions released some 166 feature films.  A phrase commonly used when referring to many of these pictures is ‘lesser known’.  Even if you restrict yourself to the horror and thriller genres for which Hammer is best remembered, there is still a large number of ‘lesser known’ works.  Of course,... Continue Reading →

Howling II: Your Sister is…a Werewolf?

Sequels often fall short of the original and never has this been more true than with Howling II. The original Howling, released in 1981 and directed by Joe Dante, achieved box office success and helped reinvigorate the werewolf genre in the early 80s. The sequel was released in 1985 and has only a thin tie-in... Continue Reading →

Dynasty of Fear

In 1972, Hammer Film Productions released a double bill titled Women in Terror.  With some influence from the giallo all'italiana film genre popular at the time, both films were psychological horrors including mystery elements.  As the title of the double feature implied, the films focused on terrorized women and how a lack of comprehension about... Continue Reading →

Crimson Peak: This House is Not a Home

Guillermo del Toro, director and co-writer of Crimson Peak (2015) would be the first to tell you it is not a horror film.  Actually I take that back.  The first person to emphatically state what Crimson Peak is not, is the film’s protagonist, Edith Cushing.  In an early scene, when Edith’s manuscript is dismissed by... Continue Reading →

The Lodge: A Slow-Burning Chiller

Released in 2019, shortly before the start of the pandemic, The Lodge is a movie for our times. Co-directed by Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz, the film centres around a broken family who travel for a holiday at an isolated lodge to try to regain some semblance of normalcy after the mother's sudden suicide. After... Continue Reading →

Powered by WordPress.com. Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑